The Observer

Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

Celebrate+the+Chinese+New+Year+with+Fordham+students.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

Celebrate the Chinese New Year with Fordham students.

Celebrate the Chinese New Year with Fordham students.

ZOEY LIU/THE OBSERVER

Celebrate the Chinese New Year with Fordham students.

ZOEY LIU/THE OBSERVER

ZOEY LIU/THE OBSERVER

Celebrate the Chinese New Year with Fordham students.

By MARIA HAYAKAWA, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Although the new year has passed for most, Chinese New Year, commonly known as Lunar New Year, is the celebration of the new year according to the lunar calendar.

We are moving on from the year of the dog to the year of the pig, the 12th sign on the Chinese zodiac, a 12-year cycle with each year representing an animal. In Chinese culture, the pig represents wealth and good fortune. A time for commemoration and family, the Lunar New Year is an exciting time for many, even our own Fordham Rams.

I asked Matthew Chen, Emily Yih and Katrina Shea, all freshmen at Fordham College at Lincoln Center (FCLC), to come talk about their family traditions back home when celebrating Lunar New Year and what they are doing this year since they are away from home.

Matthew Chen, FCLC ’22, usually celebrates this holiday with his family back in Taiwan. He said the celebration spans three days: the day before the New Year, the day of and the day after.

The day before is a time to celebrate with close family. They go out and eat lots of food. His favorite dish is peking duck bao, a white, soft steamed bun that is popular in Chinese cuisine.

The day of the Lunar New Year, he and his family would go out to a restaurant, and after he would receive the hongbao, or a red envelope, which is one of Chen’s favorite parts of the celebration. It is a widely popular tradition to give children a red envelope filled with money. “At the end of each feast, everyone but the youngest generation passes out red envelopes to people in the generations below. Then once the red envelopes have been passed out we all gamble and play mahjong. It gives the parents a chance to win back money and it’s fun,” Chen said.

Yih, FCLC ’22, also celebrates the Lunar New Year with her family at their Chinese restaurant back home in Connecticut. “Since we spend the new year working at our restaurant, it’s nice to get together at the end of the day to celebrate with not only our family but our employees, friends, neighbors and even loyal customers,” Yih said. Her favorite part of celebrating Lunar New Year is the food. “My favorite dish is peking duck bao. It’s so good!”

Shea, FCLC ’22, celebrates with her family on Long Island, where she has a big dinner with her close family. Cooking at home, they usually prepare vegetable and noodle dishes alongside each other. Eating noodles during the new year is said to bring happiness and long life.

Another tradition of Shea’s: “Don’t wash your hair the day of and after because it will wash away the good luck.”

Since Shea’s family lives close by, her grandma and her cousins are planning to come to the city to spend time with her for Lunar New Year this February. “My favorite part of Lunar New Year is seeing my family. It sounds cheesy, but I love spending time with them,” she said.

Since Chen is away from home, Yih invited him to her family’s restaurant to celebrate. Chen misses home, but he is hoping the food and time with friends will make it seem like he is back home again.

Chen said he is extremely proud of his heritage. Yih and Shea also said that they are so proud to be Chinese. If you or anyone you know celebrates this holiday, join the fun, go to the parade in Chinatown and remember to say Happy New Year!  

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Photo Feature: Lunar New Year Celebrations in NYC

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Fordham, But Make It Fashion

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Hypebeasts — The Other Side of Streetwear

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Ram Jams: ‘thank u, next’ is Sweeter than ‘Sweetener’

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Did You See ‘Bohemian Rhapsody?’ #MeToo

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Treat Your Wallet with Downton Dining Discounts

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Fordham Off-Stage Spotlight: More to Theater Than It Seams

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    Witches and Waitlists at Sundance

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    A Different Look at Love

  • Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around

    Arts & Culture

    To All the Boys I’ve Matched Before

Navigate Right
The Student Voice of Fordham Lincoln Center
Chinese New Year: Red Envelopes All Around