Students React to Smoker-Aimed Legislation

New+York+City+Mayor+Michael+Bloomberg+speaks+to+the+press+about+the+administration%27s+proposals+to+reduce+gun+violence+after+meeting+with+Vice+President+Joe+Biden+at+the+White+House+February+27%2C+2013+in+Washington%2C+DC.+%28Olivier+Douliery%2FAbaca+Press%2FMCT%29

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks to the press about the administration’s proposals to reduce gun violence after meeting with Vice President Joe Biden at the White House February 27, 2013 in Washington, DC. (Olivier Douliery/Abaca Press/MCT)

 

By IAN McKENNA and TAYLER BENNETT
Editor-in-Chief and Managing Editor
Published: November 3, 2013

New York City lawmakers passed a bill that would raise the legal age to purchase tobacco products, like cigarettes, cigars, cigarillos and even electronic cigarettes, from 18 to 21 on Oct. 30, 2013. While this age raise is the apparent centerpiece of the new legislation, which will go into effect six months after it is signed by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, the bill also increases penalties for any distributor or retailer who fails to pay tobacco taxes, prohibits discounts on tobacco products and institutes a minimum price of $10.50 for a pack of cigarettes.

Fordham College at Lincoln Center student smokers shared what they thought of the bill, how people might get around it and what it means to them.