The Observer

FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

A+student+fills+out+a+voter+registration+form+for+the+upcoming+2013+elections.+%28Photo+Illustration+by+Emily+Sawicki%2FThe+Observer%29%0D%0A
Back to Article
Back to Article

FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

A student fills out a voter registration form for the upcoming 2013 elections. (Photo Illustration by Emily Sawicki/The Observer)

A student fills out a voter registration form for the upcoming 2013 elections. (Photo Illustration by Emily Sawicki/The Observer)

A student fills out a voter registration form for the upcoming 2013 elections. (Photo Illustration by Emily Sawicki/The Observer)

A student fills out a voter registration form for the upcoming 2013 elections. (Photo Illustration by Emily Sawicki/The Observer)


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






A student fills out a voter registration form for the upcoming 2013 elections. (Photo Illustration by Emily Sawicki/The Observer)

By ERIC PANG
Staff Writer
Published: October 4, 2012

In 2008, during the last U.S. presidential election there was an increase of 5 million in voter turnout from 2004, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

The increased voter turnout was due to the two million more black voters, two million more Hispanic voters and about 600,000 more Asian voters, while the number of non-Hispanic white voters remained statistically unchanged.  Minorities are voting more, and this includes first generation Americans.

“If you want to be heard you have to vote,” Ismahan Sharhan, Fordham College at Lincoln Center (FCLC) ’15, said. Sharhan’s parents are from Yemen and she is a first generation Arab-American.

Her diverse family background is not the only reason why she feels so passionate to vote. “As a college student, Arab-American, as a Muslim and as a female it’s imperative for my voice to be heard because I am in a country where my vote actually counts,” Sharhan said.

Last presidential election, 48.5 percent of American citizens ages 18-24 were reported to vote in Nov. 2008 according to the U.S. Census Bureau. That means 12,515 people voted out of 26,718 in the 18-24 age range.

The majority of students interviewed felt that Americans have the freedom to vote for a candidate and the right to choose one is not something to take for granted. A different way to phrase it, “It’s our duty as Americans to vote,” Pat Kelly, FCLC ’14, said.

When asked why we should vote, Nadia Pinder, FCLC ’15,  said, “It is our right to vote, we as Americans have that privilege to vote in a fair and democratic election, it’s a shame that a good percentage of the population do not vote.”

Pinder’s family is from the Caribbean and West Indies. They have told her many times to vote.”

“It’s appalling that people don’t care enough to vote or even educate themselves on the election. The candidate who is elected will be making decisions about health-care, their jobs, education, taxes, things that ultimately affect everyone on a daily basis.” Pinder said.

Some students feel very strongly about people who are not voting.  “People who don’t vote are ignorant. They are not taking full advantage of their opportunity and rights. They don’t understand the power of a vote,” Victoria Elizabeth Todd, FCLC ’14, said.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, even though there was an increase in 2008 in young voter turnout, younger citizens ages 18-24 still had the lowest voting rate at 48.5 percent.  Older citizen’s age groups 45-64 and 65 plus had the highest voting rates at 69 percent and 70 percent.  Even though there was an increase of voters during the 2008 election in the 18-24 age group there is still less than half of young adults not voting.

“Voting is your way of choosing who leads your country, what is more important than that?,”  Carinna Gano, FCLC ‘14, said. Gano is a first generation American who’s family is from the Philippines. “Sure you might disagree with some politicians and issues discussed but a vote is important, it’s not something you want to throw away,” Gano said.  “We should all be interested in who is representing us not only on the national level, but on the local level as well.”

“I feel sad that people don’t vote because they feel like their vote doesn’t count. Of course it counts. I can’t force anyone to vote but I am working to register people,” Sharhan said.

Ismahan has just registered to vote this year and is currently doing an internship with the Arab American Family support center in downtown Brooklyn. She is now registering Fordham students to vote.  Interested students can contact her in order to register at [email protected] the deadline is Oct. 12.

Juan Escalante FCLC ‘14, said, “Generally, most people I have interacted with in classes lately here at Fordham are pumped about this election.”

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

    Email Newsletter

    Dean’s Office to Revise Advising Practices

  • FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

    Email Newsletter

    Women’s Soccer Evens Record at 6-6, Undefeated in Conference Play

  • FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

    Email Newsletter

    Fordham Football Loses Heartbreaker, Drops to 3-2

  • Email Newsletter

    Fordham Names New Director of Intercollegiate Athletics

  • FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

    Arts & Culture

    Bringing Musical Dreams To Fruition, One Gig At A Time

  • Email Newsletter

    Fordham Falls Five Spots in Best Colleges Ranking

  • FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

    Email Newsletter

    Fordham Supports Affirmative Action Case

  • Email Newsletter

    Take Heed of Decreasing Rankings

  • FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

    Arts & Culture

    Five Bands To Catch At This Year’s CMJ Music Marathon

  • FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting

    Email Newsletter

    Rainbow Alliance Brings ‘Queer’ Awareness

Navigate Right
The Student Voice of Fordham Lincoln Center
FCLC Weighs In On Importance of Voting